Lydia Whittaker is an aspiring volcanologist and B.Sc. Geology student at The University of Manchester. She writes about her experience as a GeoIntern, working on CO2 degassing in El Hierro and Teide for GeoTenerife. ‘Scientist (noun): a person who is studying or has expert knowledge of one or more of the natural or physical sciences.’* Being a scientist is more than that. Being a scientist is tough, and just because you did a module on volcanoes in university doesn’t mean you’re now a volcanologist.This title should only be given to someone who has faced some of the extreme conditions that may be experienced in the field and come out the other side just as enthusiastic. Preparing for a place on GeoIntern, a summer programme run by GeoTenerife in association with Invocan in the Canary Islands, you’re given a specification of professional skills you will be learning such as measuring gases and data processing, but this is only half the story. Every second of time spent is invaluable. A few of the many skills I had no idea I would be learning as a GeoTenerife GeoIntern are: 1. How to write numbers on vials in a moving vehicle on a bumpy road. 2. The ability to sit on any rock no matter how sharp. 3. Never sit down at the summit if you want to keep your trousers. 4. Communication involving a language barrier can be harder than the rocks. From the scientists you meet to the friends you make, it is a once in a lifetime opportunity to discover yourself as a young scientist.

News Staff August 3, 2018

Lydia Whittaker is an aspiring volcanologist and B.Sc. Geology student at The University of Manchester. She writes about her experience as a GeoIntern, working on CO2 degassing in El Hierro and Teide for GeoTenerife.

‘Scientist (noun): a person who is studying or has expert knowledge of one or more of the natural or physical sciences.’*

Being a scientist is more than that. Being a scientist is tough, and just because you did a module on volcanoes in university doesn’t mean you’re now a volcanologist.This title should only be given to someone who has faced some of the extreme conditions that may be experienced in the field and come out the other side just as enthusiastic.

Preparing for a place on GeoIntern, a summer programme run by GeoTenerife in association with Invocan in the Canary Islands, you’re given a specification of professional skills you will be learning such as measuring gases and data processing, but this is only half the story.

Every second of time spent is invaluable.

A few of the many skills I had no idea I would be learning as a GeoTenerife GeoIntern are:

1. How to write numbers on vials in a moving vehicle on a bumpy road.

2. The ability to sit on any rock no matter how sharp.

3. Never sit down at the summit if you want to keep your trousers.

4. Communication involving a language barrier can be harder than the rocks.

From the scientists you meet to the friends you make, it is a once in a lifetime opportunity to discover yourself as a young scientist.

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