News Staff April 8, 2019

Hereford Films is without a doubt the premiere studio for British geezer movies. Vigilantes, gangsters and hooligans have become a staple part of British cinema thanks in no small part to Hereford CEO Jonathan Sothcott’s tireless output of sweary lads films, which have now sold over a million DVDs. While newer titles such as The Krays – Dead Man Walking continue to fly off the DVD shelves, some of the highlights of the Hereford back catalogue are now free for Amazon Prime Subscribers.

Here we present the three best, which are all perfect viewing accompaniments to a takeaway and a six pack.

WE STILL KILL THE OLD WAY

Perhaps Hereford’s most iconic film, this ‘old gangsters come out of retirement to clean up the streets’ thriller is enlivened by some particularly sparky performances from TV favourites Chris Ellison, James Cosmo and particularly Ian Ogilvy, whose crinkly charm makes him an unusually engaging leading man. Director Sacha Bennett skilfully weaves dark violence with lighter moments to make a truly satisfying Britflick.

VENDETTA

Danny Dyer’s finest hour offers a glimpse of the movie star that might have been, had he not succumbed to the lure of the Walford readies. Dyer gives his most nuanced performance and is surrounded by an exceptional supporting cast including brilliant supporting turns by Alistair Petrie, Vincent Regan and Hollywood villain Bruce Payne. The action is slick and belies the film’s low budget, with director/writer Stephen Reynolds getting every penny on the screen. This one definitely deserves a sequel anytime Dyer is ready to hang up Mick Carter’s waistcoat for a while.

WE STILL STEAL THE OLD WAY

On the subject of sequels, the fun prison-based follow up to We Still Kill The Old Way never quite scales the heights of its predecessor but features an astonishingly dark, career best performance from Bill legend Billy Murray. Ogilvy, Ellison and co are on fine form once more, but the film drags a little when they’re not front and centre. Still a lot of fun and neatly sets up a second sequel, expected later this year.

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